As of 2005, Chile has a flourishing international art cinema scene. As cosmopolitan filmmakers who published their first feature-length films between 2005 and 2007, Alberto Fuguet, Pablo Larrain, Alicia Scherson, and Sebastián Silva represent this style of cinema. For example, four of Fuguet’s works, Tony Manero (2008) from Larrain, Il Futuro (2013) from Scherson, and Nasty Baby (2015) from Silva exemplify Chilean art cinema in its cosmopolitan and permeable early 21st century. These four films are characterized by their cosmopolitan filmmakers, their transnational production, distribution, and exhibition strategies, their distribution at film festivals, their affiliation with the genre of art cinema, and their portrayal of cinephilia and filmmaking as quintessentially cosmopolitan practices.

Chile’s commercial cinema has featured a lot of architectural space throughout the last 50 years. It becomes increasingly difficult to find references to architecture in the films from this time period; they are no longer considered to be important elements of local fiction. For the study, two generations of filmmakers studied a series of films published under democratic governments in order to discover variables and categories referring to the architectural aspects that are presented in the movies. 

 

To analyze local works’ narratives and their link with architecture, these parameters were identified and interpreted. Consequently, the analysis demonstrates that these architectural vestiges are gradually disappearing. A more difficult-to-identify atmospheric picture of inhabited planets has emerged as Chilean production has increased since 2000. That same aspect may well reflect Chile’s urban problems and social dynamics, proving that cinematographic art continues to be relevant as a critic of Chile’s urban problems and social dynamics.

Despite Chile’s remoteness, its architecture has developed a distinct voice. Chile is so far removed from many architectural hotspots – such as the United States, Europe, and Japan – that Chilean architects are not influenced by current fashion. This involves paying attention to what is close to you, says Alejandro Aravena: “Landscape and materials and labor (sic)” There are many ways to express yourself creatively. To Cristián Undurraga, an architect with the firm Undurraga Devés Arquitectos: “It is a particularly Chilean style of working with materials. It’s very simple to do this. Poverty is a virtue in Chile”

 

Approximately 18.1 million people live in Chile (Chile Population, 2016). Most Chileans live in cities, with 89.5% of the population living in urban areas in 2015 (Urban/rural split of countries, 2016). About five percent of Chile’s population is indigenous Mapuche.

Natural geology and seismic sensitivity in Chile, as well as the country’s European legacy, have resulted in a diverse range of architectural styles. Numerous instances of colonial-style architecture may be seen throughout the country, as well as examples of Neoclassical, Georgian, and Modern architectures. Traditional Mapuche rucas can be seen in southern Chile, built of wood and covered in hay. If you live in Malaysia and you find yourself interested in Chilean architectural styles, precision machining in Johor would be able to assist you. 

 

Using concrete, glass, and steel to construct contemporary residences, Chilean architecture has cemented the country’s position as a leader in modern design. Chile is a long country, thus it is bound to encounter a variety of weather conditions. Historical architectural structures have been influenced by climate, with stone and mud being employed in the drier north, and wood in the wetter south.

 

Despite Chile’s remoteness, its architecture has developed a distinct voice. Chile is so far removed from many architectural hotspots – such as the United States, Europe, and Japan – that Chilean architects are not influenced by current fashion. This involves paying attention to what is close to you, says Alejandro Aravena: “Landscape and materials and labor (sic)” There are many ways to express yourself creatively. To Cristián Undurraga, an architect with the firm Undurraga Devés Arquitectos: “It is a particularly Chilean style of working with materials. It’s very simple to do this. Poverty is a virtue in Chile”

 

 The Chilean colossus illustrates that movie magic is real.

In the past, it’s been conquered by the British army and occupied by the French, then converted, burned, and reborn. Jacques Tati and Julien Temple are also included in the inaugural Architecture Film Festival in London, which opens up with the film about its incredible life.

 

We see this in Escapes de Gas, a film that opens ArchFilmFest, a week-long festival of architectural films that aims to throw a spotlight on the secret lives of our cities, which will take place in London from September 15 to 22.

 

A living monument illustrating what Latin America’s first democratically elected socialist government could accomplish, it was designed as the ultimate piece of physical propaganda. “It was a symbol of Chile’s passion and dedication to helping shape a new humanity,” Allende said.

 

From embossed bronze doors to globe-shaped glass light fixtures to wicker fish mobiles, the documentary shows how the building was envisioned as an exhibition of Chilean art.

They have a long and complicated relationship, with the latter relying on the spatial drama of architecture, and both attempting to express its emotional intensity in its entirety. A former scriptwriter, Dutch architect Rem Koolhaas says: “Filmmaking and architecture are closely related professions. A narrative is needed for both. You need to construct episodes, which are like an interest-creating montage, as well as an order which builds suspense in a building’s path or experience.”